"American kin of Hitler made pact not to have children" in The Straits Times, Singapore, 9 February 2002

LOS ANGELES - The American relatives of Adolf Hitler entered into a pact to end the family bloodline by not having children, according to new research.

Investigation of the Hitler clan by a British writer has revealed that the nephew of the infamous dictator grew up in England and later moved to the United States.
 
The nephew, William Patrick Hitler, is long dead but his three sons live with their mother in Long Island, New York, according to a report in yesterday's The Advertiser newspaper.

The publicity-shy sons, who have dropped the Hitler surname, were well aware of the infamy of their bloodline.

'They talked among themselves, talked about the burden they've had in the background of their lives, and decided that none of them would marry, none of them would have children,' said journalist David Gardner.

He is promoting a new TV documentary, The Last of the Hitlers, which is based on his book of the same name.

Mr Gardner told how he approached the family in Long Island with documentary evidence that included birth dates.

'When I actually knocked at their door, this is the first time anyone had actually knocked at their door for 50 years,' he said.

'So it was something of a shock to them.

'But William Patrick's widow confirmed that her husband was indeed the nephew of Adolf Hitler.'

Mr Gardner said the three great nephews showed only a very vague resemblance to the Nazi dictator.

'They've lived all-American lives... their father grew up in England, spent six, seven years in Germany in the 1930s where his uncle gave him a job, and then he came to America just before World War II and the family's been here ever since,' he said.

Mr Gardner said William Patrick Hitler, after moving to the US, served in the US Navy and actually fought against his uncle's forces.

'But after the war it became clear that having the name Hitler was not a good thing to have,' he said.

'He changed his name and went on to marry, have a family and live in total anonymity.

'That was for the last 50 years.'.

"Secret life of the New York Hitlers" by Nicholas Rufford in the Sunday Times, London, 16 July 2000

FIFTY-FIVE years after Adolf Hitler shot himself in Berlin, the story of his descendants can finally be told: they are alive and well and living on Long Island, New York.

Three of Hitler's great-nephews, ranging in age from their mid- thirties to early fifties, run a small business and live under different names. One lives in a townhouse and another in a bungalow on the island, a summer and weekend retreat for the Manhattan elite.
 
The discovery has solved the riddle of what happened to the descendants of Hitler's British-born nephew, William Patrick Hitler. He died in the United States in 1987, aged 76, but his tombstone bears no last name to prevent it becoming an object of pilgrimage for neo-Nazis. The relatives on Long Island are three of his four sons; the eldest died in the 1980s.

Willie Hitler's life story has been untangled for the first time by the New Yorker magazine. He was born in Liverpool in 1911, the son of Hitler's half-brother Alois, who had met and married Brigid Dowling, an Irish girl, while working as a waiter in Dublin.

Young Willie moved to Berlin and became a socialite, cashing in on the glamour of the Hitler name in the 1930s. He sported a Fuhrer- style moustache and parted his hair on the right. At the age of 26, he told a British newspaper: "I am the only legal descendant of the Hitler family." Crossing his arms in Fuhrer fashion, he said: "That gesture must be in my blood, I find myself doing it more and more."

He claimed his uncle Adolf had offered him a key position in the Reich. In reality, Hitler was enraged by Willie's exploitation of the family name and described him as "one of my most repulsive relatives".

In 1939, months before Germany invaded Poland, Willie Hitler travelled to New York and toured America, telling stories about his uncle in a "clipped British accent". He drew audiences of up to 1,500 people, sharing family recollections, including references to incest, leather whips and plans for world domination.

He later applied to join the American armed forces to fight his uncle, whom he declared to be a madman, but was rejected. Eventually, he wrote directly to President Franklin Roosevelt and his case was referred to the FBI.

After a month-long investigation, it reported that "no information was developed to indicate that he was engaged in any activities of a subversive nature". The report described Willie as "an extremely lazy individual" who "constantly sought a position which paid well with little work". The report quoted an informant saying that Willie "had attempted to use a mild form of blackmail against Adolf Hitler to secure for himself a position of importance" on Hitler's staff.

In 1944, Willie eventually joined the American navy, where he served as a seaman first class. After serving for two years at training stations, he was discharged and tried to escape his past. He applied for a social security card under the name William Hiller, went to work for a urologist in Manhatten, changed his name again when he married a German woman and moved to Long Island.

A few other members of the Hitler clan are scattered across Europe. The grandchildren of Hitler's half-sister, Angela, are living in the Austrian city of Linz. Paula Hitler, Adolf's sister, and his only full-blood sibling, died alone in 1960. She is buried in an Austrian village.

The New Yorker says that a branch of Hitler's family is trying to sue for the return of assets confiscated after Hitler committed suicide. The assets, said to be worth Pounds 13m, include royalties from Mein Kampf (My Struggle), the book in which Hitler laid the foundations of his political philosophy. The rights are held by the Bavarian finance ministry, which refuses to publish it.

The American branch of the family has dismissed any claim to the Hitler estate, describing it as "blood money".
 

'Secret life of the New York Hitlers --- Adolf Hitler's descendants are alive and well and living on Long Island, N.Y." by Nicholas Rufford in The Toronto Star 22 July 2000.

After bragging in the 1930s about his uncle, Willie Hitler eventually changed his name - twice
Fifty-five years after Adolf Hitler shot himself in Berlin, the story of his descendants can finally be told: they are alive and well and living on Long Island, New York.
 
Three of Hitler's great-nephews, ranging in age from their mid-30s to early 50s, run a small business and live under different names.

One lives in a townhouse and another in a bungalow on the island, a summer and weekend retreat for the Manhattan elite.

The discovery has solved the riddle of what happened to the descendants of Hitler's British-born nephew, William Patrick Hitler.

He died in the United States in 1987, aged 76, but his tombstone bears no last name to prevent it becoming an object of pilgrimage for neo-Nazis.

The relatives on Long Island are three of his four sons; the eldest died in the 1980s.

Willie Hitler's life story has been untangled for the first time by the New Yorker magazine.

He was born in Liverpool in 1911, the son of Hitler's half-brother Alois, who had met and married Brigid Dowling, an Irish girl, while working as a waiter in Dublin.

Young Willie moved to Berlin and became a socialite, cashing in on the glamour of the Hitler name in the 1930s.

He sported a Fuhrer-style moustache and parted his hair on the right.

At the age of 26, he told a British newspaper: "I am the only legal descendant of the Hitler family."

Crossing his arms in Fuhrer fashion, he said: "That gesture must be in my blood, I find myself doing it more and more."

He claimed his uncle Adolf had offered him a key position in the Reich. In reality, Hitler was enraged by Willie's exploitation of the family name and described him as "one of my most repulsive relatives."

In 1939, months before Germany invaded Poland, Willie Hitler travelled to New York and toured America, telling stories about his uncle in a "clipped British accent."

He drew audiences of up to 1,500 people, sharing family recollections, including references to incest, leather whips and plans for world domination.

He later applied to join the American armed forces to fight his uncle, whom he declared to be a madman, but was rejected.

Eventually, he wrote directly to U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt and his case was referred to the FBI.

After a month-long investigation, it reported that "no information was developed to indicate that he was engaged in any activities of a subversive nature."

The report described Willie as "an extremely lazy individual" who "constantly sought a position which paid well with little work."

The report quoted an informant saying that Willie "had attempted to use a mild form of blackmail against Adolf Hitler to secure for himself a position of importance" on Hitler's staff.

In 1944, Willie eventually joined the American navy. After serving for two years at training stations, he was discharged. Trying to escape his past, he applied for a social security card under the name William Hiller, worked for a urologist in Manhattan and changed his name again when he married a German woman and moved to Long Island.

A few other members of the Hitler clan are scattered across Europe. The grandchildren of Hitler's half-sister, Angela, are living in the Austrian city of Linz.

Paula Hitler, Adolf's sister, and his only full-blood sibling, died alone in 1960. She is buried in an Austrian village.

The New Yorker says that a branch of Hitler's family is trying to sue for the return of assets confiscated after Hitler committed suicide.

The assets, said to be worth $2.9 million, include royalties from Mein Kampf (My Struggle), the book in which Hitler laid the foundations of his political philosophy.

The rights are held by the Bavarian finance ministry, which refuses to publish it.

The American branch of the family has dismissed any claim to the Hitler estate, describing it as "blood money."